How Fast is GDP Growing?: A Curiosum

A.  How Fast is GDP Growing?

The Bureau of Economic Analysis released today its first estimate (what it calls it’s Advance Estimate) for the growth of GDP and its components for the third quarter of 2019.  Most of it looked basically as one would expect, with an estimate of real GDP growth of 1.9% in the quarter, or about the same as the 2.0% growth rate of the second quarter.  There has been a continued slowdown in private investment (which I will discuss below), but this has been offset by an expansion in government spending under Trump, coupled with steady growth in personal consumption expenditures (as one would expect with an economy now at full employment).

But there was a surprise on the last page of the report, in Appendix Table A.  This table provides growth rates of some miscellaneous aggregates that contribute to GDP growth, as well as their contribution to overall GDP growth.  One line shown is for “motor vehicle output”.  What is surprising is that the growth rate shown, at an annualized rate, is an astounding 32.6%!  The table also indicates that real GDP excluding motor vehicle output would have grown at just 1.2% in the quarter.  (I get 1.14% using the underlying, non-rounded, numbers, but these are close.)  The difference is shown in the chart above.

Some points should be noted.  While all these figures provided by the BEA are shown at annualized growth rates, one needs to keep in mind that the underlying figures are for growth in just one quarter.  Hence the quarterly growth will be roughly one-quarter of the annual rate, plus the effects of compounding.  For the motor vehicle output numbers, the estimated growth in the quarter was 7.3%, which if compounded over four quarters would yield the 32.6% annualized rate.  One should also note that the quarterly output figures of this sector are quite volatile historically, and while there has not been a change as large as the 32.6% since 2009/10 (at the time of the economic downturn and recovery) there have been a few quarters when it was in the 20s.

But what appears especially odd, but also possibly interesting to those trying to understand how the GDP accounts are estimated, is why there should have been such a tremendously high growth in the sector, of 32.6%, when the workers at General Motors were on strike for half of September (starting on September 15).  GM is the largest car manufacturer in the US, its production plummeted during the strike, yet the GDP figures indicate that motor vehicle output not only soared in the quarter, but by itself raised overall GDP growth to 1.9% from a 1.2% rate had the sector been flat.

This is now speculation on my part, but I suspect the reason stems from the warning the BEA regularly provides that the initial GDP estimates that are issued just one month after the end of the quarter being covered, really are preliminary and partial.  The BEA receives data on the economy from numerous sources, and a substantial share of that data is incomplete just one month following the end of a quarter.  For motor vehicle production, I would not be surprised if the BEA might only be receiving data for two months (July and August in this case), in time for this initial estimate.  They would then estimate the third month based on past patterns and seasonality.

But because of the strike, past patterns will be misleading.  Production at GM may have been ramped up in July and August in anticipation of the strike, and a mechanical extrapolation of this into September, while normally fine, might have been especially misleading this time.

I stress that this is speculation on my part.  Revised estimates of GDP growth in the third quarter, based on more complete data, will be issued in late November and then again, with even more data, in late December.  We will see what these estimates say.  I would not be surprised if the growth figure for GDP is revised substantially downwards.

B.  Growth in Nonresidential Private Fixed Investment

The figures released by the BEA today also include its estimates for private fixed investment.  The nonresidential portion of this is basically business investment, and it is interesting to track what it has been doing over the last few years.  The argument made for the Trump/Republican tax cuts pushed through Congress in December 2017 were that they would spur business investment.  Corporate profit taxes were basically cut in half.

But the figures show no spur in business investment following their taxes being slashed.  Nonresidential private fixed investment was growing at a relatively high rate already in the fourth quarter of 2017 (similar to rates seen between mid-2013 and mid-2014, and there even was growth of 11.2% in the second quarter of 2014).  This continued through the first half of 2018.  But growth since has fallen steadily, and is now even negative, with a decline of 3.0% in the third quarter of 2019:

There is no indication here that slashing corporate profit taxes (and other business taxes) led to greater business investment.

The “Threat” of Job Losses is Nothing New and Not to be Feared: Issues Raised in the Democratic Debate

A.  Introduction

The televised debate held October 15 between twelve candidates for the Democratic presidential nomination covered a large number of issues.  Some were clear, but many were not.  The debate format does not allow for much explanation or nuance.  And while some of the positions taken refected sound economics, others did not.

In a series of upcoming blog posts, starting with this one, I will review several of the issues raised, focussing on the economics and sometimes the simple arithmetic (which the candidates often got wrong).  And while the debate covered a broad range of issues, I will limit my attention here to the economic ones.

This post will look at the concern that was raised (initially in a question from one of the moderators) that the US will soon be facing a massive loss of jobs due to automation.  A figure of “a quarter of American jobs” was cited.  All the candidates basically agreed, and offered various solutions.  But there is a good deal of confusion over the issue, starting with the question of whether such job “losses” are unprecedented (they are not) and then in some of the solutions proposed.

A transcript of the debate can be found at the Washington Post website, which one can refer to for the precise wording of the questions and responses.  Unfortunately it does not provide pages or line numbers to refer to, but most of the economic issues were discussed in the first hour of the three hour debate.  Alternatively, one can watch the debate at the CNN.com website.  The discussion on job losses starts at the 32:30 minute mark of the first of the four videos CNN posted at its site.

B.  Job Losses and Productivity Growth

A topic on which there was apparently broad agreement across the candidates was that an unprecedented number of jobs will be “lost” in the US in the coming years due to automation, and that this is a horrifying prospect that needs to be addressed with urgency.  Erin Burnett, one of the moderators, introduced it, citing a study that she said concluded that “about a quarter of American jobs could be lost to automation in just the next 10 years”.  While the name of the study was not explicitly cited, it appears to be one issued by the Brookings Institution in January 2019, with Mark Muro as the principal author.  It received a good deal of attention when it came out, with the focus on its purported conclusion that there would be a loss of a quarter of US jobs by 2030 (see here, here, here, here, and/or here, for examples).

[Actually, the Brookings study did not say that.  Nor was its focus on the overall impact on the number of jobs due to automation.  Rather, its purpose was to look at how automation may differentially affect different geographic zones across the US (states and metropolitan areas), as well as different occupations, as jobs vary in their degree of exposure to possible automation.  Some jobs can be highly automated with technologies that already exist today, while others cannot.  And as the Brookings authors explain, they are applying geographically a methodology that had in fact been developed earlier by the McKinsey Global Institute, presented in reports issued in January 2017 and in December 2017.  The December 2017 report is most directly relevant, and found that 23% of “jobs” in the US (measured in terms of hours of work) may be automated by 2030 using technologies that have already been demonstrated as technically possible (although not necessarily financially worthwhile as yet).  And this would have been the total over a 14 year period starting from their base year of 2016.  This was for their “midpoint scenario”, and McKinsey properly stresses that there is a very high degree of uncertainty surrounding it.]

The candidates offered various answers on how to address this perceived crisis (which I will address below), but it is worth looking first at whether this is indeed a pending crisis.

The answer is no.  While the study cited said that perhaps a quarter of jobs could be “lost to automation” by 2030 (starting from their base year of 2016), such a pace of job loss is in fact not out of line with the norm.  It is not that much different from what has been happening in the US economy for the last 150 years, or longer.

Job losses “due to automation” is just another way of saying productivity has grown.  Fewer workers are needed to produce some given level of output, or equivalently, more output can be produced for a given number of workers.  As a simple example, suppose some factory produces 100 units of some product, and to start has 100 employees.  Output per employee is then 100/100, or a ratio of 1.0.  Suppose then that over a 14 year period, the number of workers needed (following automation of some of the tasks) reduces the number of employees to just 75 to produce that 100 units of output (where that figure of 75 workers includes those who will now be maintaining and operating the new machines, as well as those workers in the economy as a whole who made the machines, with those scaled to account for the lifetime of the machines).  The productivity of the workers would then have grown to 100/75, or a ratio of 1.333.  Over a 14 year period, that implies growth in productivity of 2.1% a year.  More accurately, the McKinsey estimate was that 23% of jobs might be automated, and with this the increase in productivity would be to 100/77 = 1.30.  The growth rate over 14 years would then be 1.9% per annum.

Such an increase in productivity is not outside the norm for the US.  Indeed, it matches what the US has experienced over at least the last century and a half.  The chart at the top of this post shows how GDP per capita has grown since 1870.  The chart is plotted in logarithms, and those of you who remember their high school math will recall that a straight line in such a graph depicts a constant rate of growth.  An earlier version of this chart was originally prepared for a prior post on this blog (where one can find further discussion of its implications), and it has been updated here to reflect GDP growth in recent years (using BEA data, with the earlier data taken from the Maddison Project).

What is remarkable is how steady that rate of growth in GDP per capita has been since 1870.  One straight line fits it extraordinarily well for the entire period, with a growth rate of 1.9% a year (or 1.86% to be more precise).  And while the US is now falling below that long-term trend (since around 2008, from the onset of the economic collapse in the last year of the Bush administration), the deviation of recent years is not that much different from an earlier such deviation between the late 1940s to the mid-1960s.  It remains to be seen whether there will be a similar catch-up to the long-term trend in the coming years.

One might reasonably argue that GDP per capita is not quite productivity, which would be GDP per employee.  Over very long periods of time population and the number of workers in that population will tend to grow at a similar pace, but we could also look at GDP per employee:

This chart is based on BEA data, the agency which issues the official GDP accounts for the US, for both real GDP and the number of employees (in full time equivalent terms, so part-time workers are counted in proportion to the number of hours they work).  The figures unfortunately only go back to 1929, the oldest year for which the BEA has issued estimates.  Note also that the rise in GDP during World War II looks relatively modest here, but that is because measures of “real” GDP (when carefully estimated using standard procedures) can deviate more and more as one goes back in time from the base year for prices (2012 here), coupled with major changes in the structure of production (such as during a major war).  But the BEA figures are the best available.

Once again one finds that the pace of productivity growth was remarkably stable over the period, with a growth rate here of 1.74% a year.  It was lower during the Great Depression years, but then recovered during World War II, and was then above the 1929 to 2018 trend from the early 1950s to 1980.  And the same straight line (meaning a constant growth rate) then fit extremely well from 1980 to 2010.

Since 2010 the growth in labor productivity has been more modest, averaging just 0.5% a year from 2010 to 2018.  An important question going forward is whether the path will return to the previous trend.  If it does, the implication is that there will be more job turnover for at least a temporary period.  If it does not, and productivity growth does not return to the path it has been on since 1929, the US as a whole will not be able to enjoy the growth in overall living standards the economy had made possible before.

The McKinsey numbers for what productivity growth might be going forward, of possibly 1.9% a year, are therefore not out of line with what the economy has actually experienced over the years.  It matches the pace as measured by GDP per capita, and while the 1.74% a year found for the last almost 90 years for the measure based on GDP per employee is a bit less, they are close.  And keep in mind that the McKinsey estimate (of 1.9% growth in productivity over 14 years) is of what might be possible, with a broad range of uncertainty over what will actually happen.

The estimate that “about” a quarter of jobs may be displaced by 2030 is therefore not out of line with what the US has experienced for perhaps a century and a half.  Such disruption is certainly still significant, and should be met with measures to assist workers to transition from jobs that have been automated away to the jobs then in need of more workers.  We have not, as a country, managed this very well in the past.  But the challenge is not new.

What will those new jobs be?  While there are needs that are clear to anyone now (as Bernie Sanders noted, which I will discuss below), most of the new jobs will likely be in fields that do not even exist right now.  A careful study by Daron Acemoglu (of MIT) and Pascual Restrepo (of Boston University), published in the American Economic Review in 2018, found that about 60% of the growth in net new jobs in the US between 1980 and 2015 (an increase of 52 million, from 90 million in 1980 to 142 million in 2015) were in occupations where the specific title of the job (as defined in surveys carried out by the Census Bureau) did not even exist in 1980.  And there was a similar share of those with new job titles over the shorter periods of 1990 to 2015 or 2000 to 2015.  There is no reason not to expect this to continue going forward.  Most new jobs are likely to be in positions that are not even defined at this point.

C.  What Would the Candidates Do?

I will not comment on all the answers provided by the candidates (some of which were indecipherable), but just a few.

Bernie Sanders provided perhaps the best response by saying there is much that needs to be done, requiring millions of workers, and if government were to proceed with the programs needed, there would be plenty of jobs.  He cited specifically the need to rebuild our infrastructure (which he rightly noted is collapsing, and where I would add is an embarrassment to anyone who has seen the infrastructure in other developed economies).  He said 15 million workers would be required for that.  He also cited the Green New Deal (requiring 20 million workers), as well as needs for childcare, for education, for medicine, and in other areas.

There certainly are such needs.  Whether we can organize and pay for such programs is of course critical and would need to be addressed.  But if they can be, there will certainly be millions of workers required.

Sanders was also asked by the moderator specifically about his federal jobs guarantee proposal (and indeed the jobs topic was introduced this way).  But such a policy proposal is more problematic, and separate from the issue of whether the economy will need so many workers.  It is not clear how such a jobs guarantee, provided by the federal government, would work.  The Sanders campaign website provides almost no detail.  But a number of questions need to be addressed.  To start, would such a program be viewed as a temporary backstop for a worker, to be used when he or she cannot find another reasonable job at a wage they would accept, or something permanent?  If permanent, one is really talking more of an expanded public sector, and that does not seem to be the intention of a jobs guarantee program.  But if a backstop, how would the wage be set?  If too high, no workers would want to leave and take a different job, and the program would not be a backstop.  And would all workers in such a program be paid the same, or different based on their skills?  Presumably one would pay an engineer working on the design of infrastructure projects more than someone with just a high school degree.  But how would these be determined?  Also, with a job guarantee, can someone be fired?  Suppose they often do not show up for work?

So there are a number of issues to address, and the answers are not clear.  But more fundamentally, if there is not a shortage of jobs but rather of workers (keep in mind that the unemployment rate is now at a 50 year low), why does one need such a guarantee?  It might be warranted (on a temporary basis) during an economic downturn, when unemployment is high, but why now, when unemployment is low?  [October 28 update:  The initial version of this post had an additional statement here saying that the federal government already had “something close to a job guarantee”, as you could always join the Army.  However, as a reader pointed out, while that once may have been true, it no longer is.  So that sentence has been deleted.]

Andrew Yang responded next, arguing for his proposal of a universal basic income that would provide every adult in the country with a grant of $1,000 per month, no questions asked.  There are many issues with such a proposal, which I will address in a subsequent blog post, but would note here that his basic argument for such a universal grant follows from his assertion that jobs will be scarce due to automation.  He repeatedly asserted in the debate that we have now entered into what has been referred to as the “Fourth Industrial Revolution”, where automation will take over most jobs and millions will be forced out of work.

But as noted above, what we have seen in the US over the last 150 years (at least) is not that much different from what is now forecast for the next few decades.  Automation will reduce the number of workers needed to produce some given amount, and productivity per worker will rise.  And while this will be disruptive and lead to a good deal of job displacement (important issues that certainly need to be addressed), the pace of this in the coming decades is not anticipated to be much different from what the country has seen over the last 150 years.

A universal basic income is fundamentally a program of redistribution, and given the high and growing degree of inequality in the US, a program of redistribution might well be warranted.  I will discuss this is a separate blog post.  But such a program is not needed to provide income to workers who will be losing jobs to automation, as there will be jobs if we follow the right macro policies.  And $12,000 a year would not nearly compensate for a lost job anyway.

Elizabeth Warren’s response to the jobs question was different.  She argued that jobs have been lost not due to automation, but due to poor international trade policies.  She said:  “the data show that we have had a lot of problems with losing jobs, but the principal reason has been bad trade policy.”

Actually, this is simply not true, and the data do not support it.  There have been careful studies of the issue, but it is easy enough to see in the numbers.  For example, in an earlier post on this blog from 2016, I examined what the impact would have been on the motor vehicle sector if the US had moved to zero net imports in the sector (i.e. limiting car imports to what the US exports, which is not very much).  Employment in the sector would then have been flat, rather than decline by 17%, between the years 1967 and 2014.  But this impact would have been dwarfed by the impact of productivity gains.  The output of the motor vehicle (in real terms) was 4.5 times higher in 2014 than what it was in 1967.  If productivity had not grown, they would then have required 4.5 times as many workers.  But productivity did grow – by 5.4 times.  Hence the number of workers needed to produce the higher output actually went down by the 17% observed.  Banning imports would have had almost no effect relative to this.

D.  Summary and Conclusion

Automation is important, but is nothing new.  The Luddites destroyed factory machinery in the early 1800s in England due to a belief that the machines were taking away their jobs and that they would then be left with no prospects.  And data for the US that goes back to at least 1870 shows such job “destroying” processes have long been underway.  They have not accelerated now.  Indeed, over the past decade the pace has slowed (i.e. less job “destruction”).  But it is too soon to tell whether this deceleration is similar to fluctuations seen in the past, where there were occasional deviations but then always a return to the long-term path.

Looking forward, careful studies such as those carried out by McKinsey have estimated how many jobs may be exposed to automation (using technologies that we know already to be technically feasible).  While they emphasize that any such forecasts are subject to a great deal of uncertainty, McKinsey’s midpoint scenario estimates that perhaps 23% of jobs may be substituted away by automation between 2016 and 2030.  If so, such a pace (of 1.9% a year) would be similar to what productivity growth has been historically in the US.  There is nothing new here.

But while nothing new, that does not mean it should be ignored.  It will lead, just as it has in the past, to job displacement and disruption.  There is plenty of scope for government to assist workers in finding appropriate new jobs, and in obtaining training for them, but the US has historically never done this all that well.  Countries such as Germany have been far better at addressing such needs.

The candidate responses did not, however, address this (other than Andrew Yang saying government supported training programs in the US have not been effective).  While Bernie Sanders correctly noted there is no shortage of needs for which workers will be required, he has also proposed a jobs guarantee to be provided by the federal government.  Such a guarantee would be more problematic, with many questions not yet answered.  But it is also not clear why it would be needed in current circumstances anyway (with an economy at full employment).

Andrew Yang argued the opposite:  That the economy is facing a structural problem that will lead to mass unemployment due to automation, with a Fourth Industrial Revolution now underway that is unprecedented in US history.  But the figures show this not to be the case, with forecast prospects similar to what the US has faced in the past.  Thus the basis for his argument that we now need to do something fundamentally different (a universal basic income of $1,000 a month for every adult) falls away.  And I will address the $1,000 a month itself in a separate blog post.

Finally, Elizabeth Warren asserted that the problem stems primarily from poor international trade policy.  If we just had better trade policy, she said, there would be no jobs problem.  But this is also not borne out by the data.  Increased imports, even in the motor vehicle sector (which has long been viewed as one of the most exposed sectors to international trade), explains only a small fraction of why there are fewer workers needed in that sector now than was the case 50 years ago.  By far the more important reason is that workers in the sector are now far more productive.

The Economy Under Trump in 8 Charts – Mostly as Under Obama, Except Now With a Sharp Rise in the Government Deficit

A.  Introduction

President Trump is repeatedly asserting that the economy under his presidency (in contrast to that of his predecessor) is booming, with economic growth and jobs numbers that are unprecedented, and all a sign of his superb management skills.  The economy is indeed doing well, from a short-term perspective.  Growth has been good and unemployment is low.  But this is just a continuation of the trends that had been underway for most of Obama’s two terms in office (subsequent to his initial stabilization of an economy, that was in freefall as he entered office).

However, and importantly, the recent growth and jobs numbers are only being achieved with a high and rising fiscal deficit.  Federal government spending is now growing (in contrast to sharp cuts between 2010 and 2014, after which it was kept largely flat until mid-2017), while taxes (especially for the rich and for corporations) have been cut.  This has led to standard Keynesian stimulus, helping to keep growth up, but at precisely the wrong time.  Such stimulus was needed between 2010 and 2014, when unemployment was still high and declining only slowly.  Imagine what could have been done then to re-build our infrastructure, employing workers (and equipment) that were instead idle.

But now, with the economy at full employment, such policy instead has to be met with the Fed raising interest rates.  And with rising government expenditures and falling tax revenues, the result has been a rise in the fiscal deficit to a level that is unprecedented for the US at a time when the country is not at war and the economy is at or close to full employment.  One sees the impact especially clearly in the amounts the US Treasury has to borrow on the market to cover the deficit.  It has soared in 2018.

This blog post will look at these developments, tracing developments from 2008 (the year before Obama took office) to what the most recent data allow.  With this context, one can see what has been special, or not, under Trump.

First a note on sources:  Figures on real GDP, on foreign trade, and on government expenditures, are from the National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA) produced by the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) of the Department of Commerce.  Figures on employment and unemployment are from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) of the Department of Labor.  Figures on the federal budget deficit are from the Congressional Budget Office (CBO).  And figures on government borrowing are from the US Treasury.

B.  The Growth in GDP and in the Number Employed, and the Unemployment Rate

First, what has happened to overall output, and to jobs?  The chart at the top of this post shows the growth of real GDP, presented in terms of growth over the same period one year before (in order to even out the normal quarterly fluctuations).  GDP was collapsing when Obama took office in January 2009.  He was then able to turn this around quickly, with positive quarterly growth returning in mid-2009, and by mid-2010 GDP was growing at a pace of over 3% (in terms of growth over the year-earlier period).  It then fluctuated within a range from about 1% to almost 4% for the remainder of his term in office.  It would have been higher had the Republican Congress not forced cuts in fiscal expenditures despite the continued unemployment.  But growth still averaged 2.2% per annum in real terms from mid-2009 to end-2016, despite those cuts.

GDP growth under Trump hit 3.0% (over the same period one year before) in the third quarter of 2018.  This is good.  And it is the best such growth since … 2015.  That is not really so special.

Net job growth has followed the same basic path as GDP:

 

Jobs were collapsing when Obama took office, he was quickly able to stabilize this with the stimulus package and other measures (especially by the Fed), and job growth resumed.  By late 2011, net job growth (in terms of rolling 12-month totals (which is the same as the increase over what jobs were one year before) was over 2 million per year.  It went to as high as 3 million by early 2015.  Under Trump, it hit 2 1/2 million by September 2018.  This is pretty good, especially with the economy now at or close to full employment.  And it is the best since … January 2017, the month Obama left office.

Finally, the unemployment rate:

Unemployment was rising rapidly as Obama was inaugurated, and hit 10% in late 2009.  It then fell, and at a remarkably steady pace.  It could have fallen faster had government spending not been cut back, but nonetheless it was falling.  And this has continued under Trump.  While commendable, it is not a miracle.

C.  Foreign Trade

Trump has also launched a trade war.  Starting in late 2017, high tariffs were imposed on imports of certain foreign-produced products, with such tariffs then raised and extended to other products when foreign countries responded (as one would expect) with tariffs of their own on selected US products.  Trump claims his new tariffs will reduce the US trade deficit.  As discussed in an earlier blog post, such a belief reflects a fundamental misunderstanding of how the trade balance is determined.

But what do we see in the data?:

The trade deficit has not been reduced – it has grown in 2018.  While it might appear there had been some recovery (reduction in the deficit) in the second quarter of the year, this was due to special factors.  Exports primarily of soybeans and corn to China (but also other products, and to other countries where new tariffs were anticipated) were rushed out in that quarter in order arrive before retaliatory tariffs were imposed (which they were – in July 2018 in the case of China).  But this was simply a bringing forward of products that, under normal conditions, would have been exported later.  And as one sees, the trade balance returned to its previous path in the third quarter.

The growing trade imbalance is a concern.  For 2018, it is on course for reaching 5% of GDP (when measured in constant prices of 2012).  But as was discussed in the earlier blog post on the determination of the trade balance, it is not tariffs which determine what that overall balance will be for the economy.  Rather, it is basic macro factors (the balance between domestic savings and domestic investment) that determine what the overall trade balance will be.  Tariffs may affect the pattern of trade (shifting imports and exports from one country to another), but they won’t reduce the overall deficit unless the domestic savings/investment balance is changed.  And tariffs have little effect on that balance.

And while the trend of a growing trade imbalance since Trump took office is a continuation of the trend seen in the years before, when Obama was president, there is a key difference.  Under Obama, the trade deficit did increase (become more negative), especially from its lowest point in the middle of 2009.  But this increase in the deficit was not driven by higher government spending – government spending on goods and services (both as a share of GDP and in constant dollar terms) actually fell.  That is, government savings rose (dissavings was reduced, as there was a deficit).  Private domestic savings was also largely unchanged (as a share of GDP).  Rather, what drove the higher trade deficit during Obama’s term was the recovery in private investment from the low point it had reached in the 2008/09 recession.

The situation under Trump is different.  Government spending is now growing, as is the government deficit, and this is driving the trade deficit higher.  We will discuss this next.

D.  Government Accounts

An increase in government spending is needed in an economic downturn to sustain demand so that unemployment will be reduced (or at least not rise by as much otherwise).  Thus government spending was allowed to rise in 2008, in the last year of the Bush administration, in response to the downturn that began in December 2007.  This continued, and was indeed accelerated, as part of the stimulus program passed by Congress soon after Obama took office.  But federal government spending on goods and services peaked in mid-2010, and after that fell.  The Republican Congress forced further expenditure cuts, and by late 2013 the federal government was spending less (in real terms) than it was in early 2008:

This was foolish.  Unemployment was over 9 1/2% in mid-2010, and still over 6 1/2% in late-2013 (see the chart of the unemployment rate above).  And while the unemployment rate did fall over this period, there was justified criticism that the pace of recovery was slow.  The cuts in government spending during this period acted as a major drag on the economy, holding back the pace of recovery.  Never before had a US administration done this in the period after a downturn (at least not in the last half-century where I have examined the data).  Government spending grew especially rapidly under Reagan following the 1981/82 downturn.

Federal government spending on goods and services was then essentially flat in real terms from late 2013 to the end of Obama’s term in office.  And this more or less continued through FY2017 (the last budget of Obama), i.e. through the third quarter of CY2018.  But then, in the fourth quarter of CY2017 (the first quarter of FY2018, as the fiscal year runs from October to September), in the first full budget under Trump, federal government spending started to rise sharply.  See the chart above.  And this has continued.

There are certainly high priority government spending needs.  But the sequencing has been terribly mismanaged.  Higher government spending (e.g. to repair our public infrastructure) could have been carried out when unemployment was still high.  Utilizing idle resources, one would not only have put people to work, but also would have done this at little cost to the overall economy.  The workers were unemployed otherwise.

But higher government spending now, when unemployment is low, means that workers hired for government-funded projects have to be drawn from other activities.  While the unemployment rate can be squeezed downward some, and has been, there is a limit to how far this can go.  And since we are close to that limit, the Fed is raising interest rates in order to curtail other spending.

One sees this in the numbers.  Overall private fixed investment fell at an annual rate of 0.3% in the third quarter of 2018 (based on the initial estimates released by the BEA in late October), led by a 7.9% fall in business investment in structures (offices, etc.) and by a 4.0% fall in residential investment (homes).  While these are figures only for one quarter (there was a deceleration in the second quarter, but not an absolute fall), and can be expected to eventually change (with the economy growing, investment will at some point need to rise to catch up), the direction so far is worrisome.

And note also that this fall in the pace of investment has happened despite the huge cuts in corporate taxes from the start of this year.  Trump officials and Republicans in Congress asserted that the cuts in taxes on corporate profits would lead to a surge in investment.  Many economists (including myself, in the post cited above) noted that there was little reason to believe such tax cuts would sput corporate investment.  Such investment in the US is not now constrained by a lack of available cash to the corporations, so giving them more cash is not going to make much of a difference.  Rather, that windfall would instead lead corporations to increase dividends as well as share buybacks in order to distribute the excess cash to their shareholders.  And that is indeed what has happened, with share buybacks hitting record levels this year.

Returning to government spending, for the overall impact on the economy one should also examine such spending at the state and local level, in addition to the federal.  The picture is largely similar:

This mostly follows the same pattern as seen above for federal government spending on goods and services, with the exception that there was an increase in total government spending from early 2014 to early-2016, when federal spending was largely flat.  This may explain, in part, the relatively better growth in GDP seen over that period (see the chart at the top of this post), and then the slower pace in 2016 as all spending leveled off.

But then, starting in late-2017, total government expenditures on goods and services started to rise.  It was, however, largely driven by the federal government component.  Even though federal government spending accounted only for a bit over one-third (38%) of total government spending on goods and services in the quarter when Trump took office, almost two-thirds (65%) of the increase in government spending since then was due to higher spending by the federal government.  All this is classical Keynesian stimulus, but at a time when the economy is close to full employment.

So far we have focused on government spending on goods and services, as that is the component of government spending which enters directly as a component of GDP spending.  It is also the component of the government accounts which will in general have the largest multiplier effect on GDP.  But to arrive at the overall fiscal deficit, one must also take into account government spending on transfers (such as for Social Security), as well as tax revenues.  For these, and for the overall deficit, it is best to move to fiscal year numbers, where the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) provides the most easily accessible and up-to-date figures.

Tracing the overall federal fiscal deficit, now by fiscal year and in nominal dollar terms, one finds:

The deficit is now growing (the fiscal balance is becoming more negative) and indeed has been since FY2016.  What happened in FY2016?  Primarily there was a sharp reduction in the pace of tax revenues being collected.  And this has continued through FY2018, spurred further by the major tax cut bill of December 2017.  Taxes had been rising, along with the economic recovery, increasing by an average of $217 billion per year between FY2010 and FY2015 (calculated from CBO figures), but this then decelerated to a pace of just $26 billion per year between FY2015 and FY2018, and just $13 billion in FY2018.  The rate of growth in taxes between FY2015 and FY2018 was just 0.8%, or less even than just inflation.

Federal government spending, including on transfers, also rose over this period, but by less than taxes fell.  Overall federal government spending rose by an average of just $46 billion per year between FY2010 and FY2015 (a rate of growth of 1.3% per annum, or less than inflation in those years), and then by $140 billion per year (in nominal dollar terms) between FY2015 and FY2018.  But this step up in overall spending (of $94 billion per year) was well less than the step down in the pace of tax collection (a reduction of $191 billion per year, the difference between $217 billion annual growth over FY2010-15 and the $26 billion annual growth over FY2015-18).

That is, about two-thirds (67%) of the increase in the fiscal deficit since FY2015 can be attributed to taxes being cut, and just one-third (33%) to spending going up.

Looking forward, this is expected to get far worse.  As was discussed in an earlier post on this blog, the CBO is forecasting (in their most recent forecast, from April 2018) that the fiscal deficits under Trump will reach close to $1 trillion in FY2019, and will exceed 5% of GDP for most of the 2020s.  This is unprecedented for the US economy at full employment, other than during World War II.  Furthermore, these CBO forecasts are under the optimistic scenario that there will be no economic downturn over this period.  But that has never happened before in the US.

Deficits need to be funded by borrowing.  And one sees an especially sharp jump in the net amount being borrowed in the markets in CY 2018:

 

These figures are for calendar years, and the number for 2018 includes what the US Treasury announced on October 29 it expects to borrow in the fourth quarter.  Note this borrowing is what the Treasury does in the regular, commercial, markets, and is a net figure (i.e. new borrowing less repayment of debt coming due).  It comes after whatever the net impact of public trust fund operations (such as for the Social Security Trust Fund) is on Treasury funding needs.

The turnaround in 2018 is stark.  The US Treasury now expects to borrow in the financial markets, net, a total of $1,338 billion in 2018, up from $546 billion in 2017.  And this is at time of low unemployment, in sharp contrast to 2008 to 2010, when the economy had fallen into the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression  Tax revenues were then low (incomes were low) while spending needed to be kept up.  The last time unemployment was low and similar to what it is now, in the late-1990s during the Clinton administration, the fiscal accounts were in surplus.  They are far from that now. 

E. Conclusion 

The economy has continued to grow since Trump took office, with GDP and employment rising and unemployment falling.  This has been at rates much the same as we saw under Obama.  There is, however, one big difference.  Fiscal deficits are now rising rapidly.  Such deficits are unprecedented for the US at a time when unemployment is low.  And the deficits have led to a sharp jump in Treasury borrowing needs.

These deficits are forecast to get worse in the coming years even if the economy should remain at full employment.  Yet there will eventually be a downturn.  There always has been.  And when that happens, deficits will jump even further, as taxes will fall in a downturn while spending needs will rise.

Other countries have tried such populist economic policies as Trump is now following, when despite high fiscal deficits at a time of full employment, taxes are cut while government spending is raised.  They have always, in the end, led to disasters.

Why Do the Quarterly GDP Figures Bounce Around So Much?: Econ 101

A.  Introduction

The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) released on July 27 its initial estimate of GDP growth in the second quarter of 2018 (what it technically calls its “advance estimate”).  It was a good report:  Its initial estimate is that GDP grew at an annualized rate of 4.1% in real terms in the quarter.  Such growth, if sustained, would be excellent.

But as many analysts noted, there are good reasons to believe that such a growth rate will not be sustained.  There were special, one-time, factors, such as that the second quarter growth (at a 4.1% annual rate) had followed a relatively modest rate of growth in the first quarter of 2.2%.  Taking the two together, the growth was a good, but not outstanding, rate of 3.1%.

More fundamentally, with the economy now at full employment, few (other than Trump) expect growth at a sustained rate of 4% or more.  Federal Reserve Board members, for example, on average expect GDP growth of 2.8% in 2018 as a whole, with this coming down to a rate of 1.8% in the longer run.  And the Congression Budget Office (in forecasts published in April) is forecasting GDP growth of 3.0% in 2018, coming down to an average rate of 1.8% over 2018 to 2028.  The fundamental issue is that the population is aging, so the growth rate of the labor force is slowing.  As discussed in an earlier post on this blog, unless the productivity of those workers started to grow at an unprecedented rate (faster than has ever been achieved in the post-World War II period), we cannot expect GDP to grow for a sustained period going forward at a rate of 3%, much less 4%.

But there will be quarter to quarter fluctuations.  As seen in the chart at the top of this post covering the period just since 2006, there have been a number of quarters in recent years where GDP grew at an annualized rate of 4% or more.  Indeed, growth reached 5.1% in the second quarter of 2012, with this followed by an also high 4.9% rate in the next quarter.  But it then came back down.  And there were also two quarters (setting aside the period of the 2008/09 recession) which had growth of a negative 1.0%.  On average, GDP growth was around 2% (at an annual rate) during Obama’s two terms in office (2.2% annually from the end of the recession in mid-2009).

Seen in this context, the 4.1% rate in the initial estimate for the second quarter of 2018 was not special.  There have been a number of such cases (and with even substantially higher growth rates for a quarter or even two) in the recent past, even though average growth was just half that.  The quarterly rates bounce around.  But it is of interest to examine why they bounce around so much, and that is the purpose of this blog post.

B.  Reasons for this Volatility

There are a number of reasons why one should not be surprised that these quarter to quarter growth rates in GDP vary as they do.  I will present several here.  And note that these reasons are not mutually exclusive.  Several of them could be acting together and be significant factors in any given quarter.

a)  There may have been actual changes in growth:

To start, and to be complete, one should not exclude the possibility that the growth in the quarter (or the lack of it) was genuine.  Perhaps output did speed up (or slow down) as estimated.  Car plants might go on extra shifts (or close for a period) due to consumers wanting to buy more cars (or fewer cars) in the period for some reason.  There might also be some policy change that might temporarily spur production (or the opposite).  For example, Trump’s recent trade measures, and the response to them from our trading partners, may have brought forward production and trade that would have been undertaken later in the year, in order to avoid tariffs threatened to be imposed later.  This could change quarterly GDP even though GDP for the year as a whole will not be affected positively (indeed the overall impact would likely be negative).

[Side note:  But one special factor in this past quarter, cited in numerous news reports (see, for example, here, here, here, here, and here), was that a jump in exports of soybeans was a key reason for the higher-than-recently-achieved rate of GDP growth.  This was not correct.  Soybean exports did indeed rise sharply, with this attributed to the response threatened by China and others to the new tariffs Trump has imposed.  China and others said they would respond with higher tariffs of their own, targeted on products such as soybeans coming from the US.  There was thus a rush to export soybeans in the period between when China first announced they would impose such retaliatory tariffs (in late March) and when they were then imposed (ultimately on July 6).

But while soybean exports did indeed increase sharply in the April to June quarter, soybeans are a crop that takes many months to grow.  Whatever increase in shipments there was had to come out of inventories.  An increase in exports would have to be matched by a similar decrease in inventories, with this true also for corn and other such crops.  There would be a similar issue for any increase in exports of Kentucky bourbon, also a target of retaliatory tariffs.  Any decent bourbon is aged for at least three years.

One must keep in mind that GDP (Gross Domestic Product) is a measure of production, and the only production that might have followed from the increased exports of soybeans or similar products would have been of packing and shipping services.  But packing and shipping costs are only a relatively small share of the total value of the products being exported.

Having said that, one should not then go to the opposite extreme and assume that the threatened trade war had no impact on production and hence GDP in the quarter.  It probably did.  With tariffs and then retaliatory tariffs being threatened (but to be imposed two or three months in the future), there were probably increased factory orders to make and ship various goods before such new tariffs would enter into effect.  Thus there likely was some impact on GDP, but to an extent that cannot be quantified in what we see in the national level accounts.  And with such factory orders simply bringing forward orders that likely would have been made later in the year, one may well see a fallback in the pace of GDP growth in the remainder of the year.  But there are many other factors as well affecting GDP growth, and we will need to wait and see what the net impact will be.]

So one should not exclude the possibility that the fluctuation in the quarterly growth rate is real.  But it could be due to many other factors as well, as we will discuss below.

b)  Change at an Annualized Rate is Not the Change in a Quarter:

While easily confused, keep in mind also that in the accounts as normally published and presented in the US, the rates of growth of GDP (and of the other economic variables) are shown as annual equivalent rates.  The actual change in the quarter is only about one-fourth of this (a bit less due to compounding).  That is, in the second quarter of 2018, the BEA estimated that GDP (on a seasonally adjusted basis, which I will discuss below as a separate factor) grew by 1.00% (and yes, exactly 1.00% within two significant digits).  But at an annualized rate (some say “annual rate”, and either term can be used), this would imply a rate of growth of 4.06% (which rounded becomes 4.1%).  It is equal to slightly more than 4.0% due to compounding.  [Technically, 1% growth in the quarter means 1.00 will grow to 1.01, and taking 1.01 to the fourth power yields 1.0406, or an increase of 4.06%.]

Thus it is not correct to say that “GDP grew by 4.1% in the second quarter”.  It did not – it grew by 1.0%.  What is correct is to say that “GDP grew at an annualized rate of 4.1% in the second quarter”.

Not all national statistical agencies present such figures in annualized terms.  European agencies, for example, generally present the quarterly growth figures as simply the growth in the quarter.  Thus, for example, Eurostat on June 7 announced that GDP in the eurozone rose by an estimated 0.4% in the first quarter of 2018.  This 0.4% was the growth in the quarter.  But that 0.4% growth figure would be equivalent to growth of 1.6% on an annualized basis (actually 1.61%, if the growth had been precisely 0.400%).  Furthermore, the European agencies will generally also focus on the growth in GDP over what it had been a year earlier in that same quarter.  In the first quarter of 2018, this growth over the year-earlier period was an estimated 2.5% according to the Eurostat release.  But the growth since the year-earlier period is not the same as the growth in the current quarter at an annualized rate.  They can easily be confused if one is not aware of the conventions used by the different agencies.

c)  Don’t confuse the level of GDP with the change in GDP:

Also along the lines of how we might misleadingly interpret figures, one needs to keep in mind that while the quarterly growth rates can, and do, bounce around a lot, the underlying levels of GDP are really not changing much.  While a 4% annual growth rate is four times as high as a 1% growth rate, for example, the underlying level of GDP in one calendar quarter is only increasing to a level of about 101 (starting from a base of 100 in this example) with growth at a 4% annual rate, versus to a level of 100.25 when  growth is at an annual rate of 1%.  While such a difference in growth rates matters a great deal (indeed a huge deal) if sustained over time, the difference in any one quarter is not that much.

Indeed, I personally find the estimated quarter to quarter levels of GDP in the US (after seasonal adjustment, which will be discussed below) to be surprisingly stable.  Keep in mind that GDP is a flow, not a stock.  It is like the flow of water in a river, not a stock such as the body of water in a reservoir.  Flows can go sharply up and down, while stocks do not, and some may mistakenly treat the GDP figures in their mind as a stock rather than a flow.  GDP measures the flow of goods and services produced over some period of time (a calendar quarter in the quarterly figures).  A flow of GDP to 101 in some quarter (from a base of 100 in the preceding quarter) is not really that different to an increase to 100.25.  While this would matter (and matter a good deal) if the different quarterly increases are sustained over time, this is not that significant when just for one quarter.

d)  Statistical noise matters:

Moving now to more substantive reasons why one should expect a significant amount of quarter to quarter volatility, one needs to recognize that GDP is estimated based on surveys and other such sources of statistical information.  The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) of the US Department of Commerce, which is responsible for the estimates of the GDP accounts in the US (which are formally called the National Income and Product Accounts, or NIPA), bases its estimates on a wide variety of surveys, samples of tax returns, and other such partial figures.  The estimates are not based on a full and complete census of all production each quarter.  Indeed, such an economic census is only undertaken once every five years, and is carried out by the US Census Bureau.

One should also recognize that an estimate of real GDP depends on two measures, each of which is subject to sampling and other error.  One does not, and cannot, measure “real GDP” directly.  Rather, one estimates what nominal GDP has been (based on estimates in current dollars of the value of all economic transactions that enter into GDP), and then how much prices have changed.  Price indices are estimated based on the prices of surveyed samples, and the components of real GDP are then estimated from the nominal GDP of the component divided by the relevant price index.  Real GDP is only obtained indirectly.

There will then be two sets of errors in the measurements:  One for the nominal GDP flows and one for the price indices.  And surveys, whether of income flows or of prices, are necessarily partial.  Even if totally accurate for the firms and other entities sampled, one cannot say with certainty whether those sampled in that quarter are fully representative of everyone in the economy.  This is in particular a problem (which the BEA recognizes) in capturing what is happening to newly established firms.  Such firms will not be included in the samples used (as they did not exist when the samples were set up) and the experiences of such newly established firms can be quite different from those of established firms.

And what I am calling here statistical “noise” encompasses more than simply sampling error.  Indeed, sampling error (the fact that two samples will come up with different results simply due to the randomness of who is chosen) is probably the least concern.  Rather, systemic issues arise whenever one is trying to infer measures at the national level from the results found in some survey.  The results will depend, for example, on whether all the components were captured well, and even on how the questions are phrased.  We will discuss below (in Section C, where we look at a comparison of estimates of GDP to estimates of Gross Domestic Income, or GDI, which in principle should be the same) that the statistical discrepancy between the estimates of GDP and GDI does not vary randomly from one quarter to the next but rather fairly smoothly (what economists and statisticians call “autocorrelation” – see Section C).  This is an indication that there are systemic issues, and not simply something arising from sample randomness.

Finally, even if that statistical error was small enough to allow one to be confident that we measured real GDP within an accuracy of just, say, +/- 1%, one would not then be able to say whether GDP in that quarter had increased at an annualized rate of about 4%, or decreased by about 4%.  A small quarterly difference looms large when looked at in terms of annualized rates.

I do not know what the actual statistical error might be in the GDP estimates, and it appears they are well less than +/- 1% (based on the volatility actually observed in the quarter to quarter figures).  But a relatively small error in the estimates of real GDP in any quarter could still lead to quite substantial volatility in the estimates of the quarter to quarter growth.

e)  Seasonal adjustment is necessary, but not easy to do:

Economic activity varies over the course of the year, with predictable patterns.  There is a seasonality to holidays, to when crops are grown, to when students graduate from school and enter the job market, and much much more.  Thus the GDP data we normally focus on has been adjusted by various statistical methods to remove the seasonality factor, making use of past data to estimate what the patterns are.

The importance of this can be seen if one compares what the seasonally adjusted levels of GDP look like compared to the levels before seasonal adjustment.  Note the level of GDP here is for one calendar quarter – it will be four times this at an annual rate:

There is a regular pattern to GDP:  It is relatively high in the last quarter of each year, relatively low in the first quarter, and somewhere in between in the second and third quarters.  The seasonally adjusted series takes account of this, and is far smoother.  Calculating quarterly growth rates from a series which has not been adjusted for seasonality would be misleading in the extreme, and not of much use.

But adjusting for seasonality is not easy to do.  While the best statisticians around have tried to come up with good statistical routines to do this, it is inherently difficult.  A fundamental problem is that one can only look for patterns based on what they have been in the past, but the number of observations one has will necessarily be limited.  If one went back to use 20 years of data, say, one would only have 20 observations to ascertain the statistical pattern.  This is not much.  One could go back further, but then one has the problem that the economy as it existed 30 or 40 years ago (and indeed even 20 years ago) was quite different from what it is now, and the seasonal patterns could also now be significantly different.  While there are sophisticated statistical routines that have been developed to try to make best use of the available data (and the changes observed in the economy over time), this can only be imperfect.

Indeed, the GDP estimates released by the BEA on July 27 incorporated a number of methodological changes (which we will discuss below), one of which was a major update to the statistical routines used for the seasonal adjustment calculations.  Many observers (including at the BEA) had noted in recent years that (seasonally adjusted) GDP growth in the first quarter of each year was unusually and consistently low.  It then recovered in the second quarter.  This did not look right.

One aim of the update to the seasonal adjustment statistical routines was to address this issue.  Whether it was fully successful is not fully clear.  As seen in the chart at the top of this post (which reflects estimates that have been seasonally adjusted based on the new statistical routines), there still appear to be significant dips in the seasonally adjusted first quarter figures in many of the years (comparing the first quarter GDP figures to those just before and just after – i.e. in 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2014, and perhaps 2017 and 2018.  This would be more frequent than one would expect if the residual changes were now random over the period).  However, this is an observation based just on a simple look at a limited sample.  The BEA has looked at this far more carefully, and rigorously, and believes that the new seasonal adjustment routines it has developed have removed any residual seasonality in the series as estimated.

f)  The timing of weekends and holidays may also enter, and could be important:

The production of the goods and services that make up the flow of GDP will also differ on Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays.  But the number of Saturdays, Sundays, and certain holidays may differ from one year to the next.  While there are normally 13 Saturdays and 13 Sundays in each calendar quarter, and most holidays will be in the same quarter each year, this will not always be the case.

For example, there were just 12 Sundays in the first quarter of 2018, rather than the normal 13.  And there will be 14 Sundays in the third quarter of 2018, rather than the normal 13.  In 2019, we will see a reversion to the “normal” 13 Sundays in each of the quarters.  This could have an impact.

Assume, just for the sake of illustration, that production of what goes into GDP is only one-half as much on a Saturday, Sunday, or holiday, than it is on a regular Monday through Friday workday.  It will not be zero, as many stores, as well as certain industrial plants, are still open, and I am just using the one-half for illustration.  Using this, and based on a simple check of the calendars for 2018 and 2019, one will find there were 62 regular, Monday through Friday, non-holiday workdays in the first quarter of 2018, while there will be 61 such regular workdays in the first quarter of 2019.  The number of Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays were 28 in the first quarter of 2018 (equivalent to 14 regular workdays in terms of GDP produced, assuming the one-half figure), while the number of Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays will be 29 in the first quarter of 2019 (equivalent to 14.5 regular workdays).  Thus the total regular work-day equivalents will be 76 in 2018 (equal to 62 plus 14), falling to 75.5 in 2019 (equal to 61 plus 14.5).  This will be a reduction of 0.7% between the periods in 2018 and 2019 (75.5/76), or a fall of 2.6% at an annualized rate.  This is not small.

The changes due to the timing of holidays could matter even more, especially for certain countries around the world.  Easter, for example, was celebrated in March (the first quarter) in 2013 and 2016, but came in April (the second quarter) in 2014, 2015, 2017, and 2018.  In Europe and Latin America, it is customary to take up to a week of vacation around the Easter holidays.  The change in economic activity from year to year, with Easter celebrated in one quarter in one year but a different one in the next, will make a significant difference to economic activity as measured in the quarter.

And in Muslim countries, Ramadan (a month of fasting from sunrise to sunset), followed by the three-day celebration of Eid al-Fitr, will rotate through the full year (in terms of the Western calendar) as it is linked to the lunar cycle.

Hence it would make sense to adjust the quarterly figures not only for the normal seasonal adjustment, but also for any changes in the number of weekends and holidays in some particular calendar quarter.  Eurostat and most (but not all) European countries make such an adjustment for the number of working days in a quarter before they apply the seasonal adjustment factors.  But I have not been able to find how the US handles this.  The adjustment might be buried somehow in the seasonal adjustment routines, but I have not seen a document saying this.  If no adjustment is made, then this might explain part of the quarterly fluctuations seen in the figures.

g)  There have been, and always will be, updates to the methodology used:

As noted above, the GDP figures released on July 27 reflected a major update in the methodology followed by the BEA to arrive at its GDP estimates.  Not only was there extensive work on the seasonal adjustment routines, but there were definitional and other changes.  The accounts were also updated to reflect the findings from the 2012 Economic Census, and prices were changed from a previous base of 2009 to now 2012.  The July 27 release summarized the changes, and more detail on what was done is available from a BEA report issued in April.  And with the revisions in definitions and certain other methodological changes, the BEA revised its NIPA figures going all the way back to 1929, the first year with official GDP estimates.

The BEA makes such changes on a regularly scheduled basis.  There is normally an annual change released each year with the July report on GDP in the second quarter of the year.  This annual change incorporates new weights (from recent annual surveys) and normally some limited methodological changes, and the published estimates are normally then revised going back three and a half years.  See, for example, this description of what was done in July 2017.

On top of this, there is then a much larger change once every five years.  The findings from the most recent Economic Census (which is carried out every five years) are incorporated, seasonal adjustment factors are re-estimated, and major definitional or methodological changes may be incorporated.  The July 2018 release reflected one of those five-year changes.  It was the 15th such comprehensive revision to the NIPA accounts undertaken by the BEA.

I stress this to make the point that the GDP figures are estimates, and as estimates are always subject to change.  The professionals at the BEA are widely admired around the world for the quality of their work, and do an excellent job in my opinion.  But no estimates will ever be perfect.  One has to recognize that there will be a degree of uncertainty surrounding any such estimates, and that the quarter to quarter volatility observed will derive at least in part from the inherent uncertainty in any such estimates.

C.  Estimates of GDP versus Estimates of GDI

One way to develop a feel for how much the changes in quarterly GDP may be due to the inherent uncertainty in the estimates is to compare it to the estimated quarterly changes in Gross Domestic Income (GDI).  GDP (Gross Domestic Product) measures the value of everything produced.  GDI measures the value of all incomes (wages, profits, rents, etc.) generated.  In principle, the totals should be the same, as the value of whatever is produced accrues to someone as income.  They should add up to the same thing.

But the BEA arrives at its estimates of GDP and of GDI by different routes.  As a consequence, the estimates of the totals will then differ.  The differences are not huge in absolute amount, nor have they grown over time (as a share of GDP or of GDI).  That is, on average the estimates match each other over time, with the same central tendency.  But they differ by some amount in any individual quarter, and hence the quarter to quarter growth rates will differ.  And for the reasons reviewed above, those slight changes in the levels in any individual quarter can translate into often major differences in the growth rates from one quarter to the next.  And these differences may appear to be particularly large when the growth rates are then presented in annualized terms.

For the period since 2006, the two sets of growth rates were (where the initial estimate for the second quarter of 2018 will not be available until the end-August figures come out):

As is seen, the alternative estimates of growth in any individual quarter can be quite different.  There was an especially large difference in the first quarter of 2012, when the estimated growth in GDP was 3.2% at an annual rate, while the estimated growth in GDI was a giant 8.7%.

Which is correct?  Was the growth rate in the first quarter of 2012 3.2% (as found with the GDP estimate) or 8.7% (as found with the GDI estimate)?  The answer is we do not know, and indeed that probably neither is correct.  What is most likely is that the true figure is probably somewhere in between.

Furthermore, and also moderating what the impact on the differences in the respective estimated growth rates will be, it is not the case that the estimates of GDP and GDI are statistically independent of each other, with the two bouncing around randomly with respect to each other.  Rather, if one looks at what the BEA calls the “statistical discrepancy” (the difference between GDP and GDI), one finds that if, say, the estimate of GDP were above the estimate of GDI in one quarter, then it likely would also be above in the next quarter.  Not by the same amount, and the differences would evolve over time, but moving more like waves than as balls ricocheting around.  Economists and statisticians refer to this as “autocorrelation”, and it indicates that there is some systemic error in the estimates of GDP and of GDI, which carries over from one quarter to the next.  What the source of that is, we do not know.  If we did know, then it would be eliminated.  But the fact such autocorrelation exists tells us that there is some source of systemic error in the measures of GDP and GDI, and we have not been able to discover the source.

Estimates are estimates.  We need to recognize that there will be statistical uncertainty in any such figures.  Even if they even out over time, the estimated growth from one quarter to the next will reflect such statistical volatility.  The differences seen in the estimated rates of growth in any one quarter for total output (estimated by way of GDP versus by way of GDI) provides a useful benchmark for how to judge the reported changes seen in growth for GDP in any individual quarter.  The true volatility (for purely statistical reasons) is likely to be at least as much, if not more.

D.  Conclusion

There are many reasons, then, to expect the quarterly growth figures to bounce around.  One should not place too much weight on the estimates from any individual quarter.  It is the longer term trends that matter.  The estimated figure for growth in GDP of 4.1% in the second quarter was not out of line with what has been seen in a number of quarters in recent years.  But growth since mid-2009 has only been about one half as much on average, despite several quarters when estimated growth was well in excess of 4.1%.

To conclude, some may find of interest three country cases I am personally familiar with which illustrate why one needs to exercise care, and with an understanding of the country context, when considering what is meaningful or not for reported figures on GDP growth.  The countries are Japan, China, and an unidentified, but newly independent, former colony in the 1960s.

a)  Japan:  In the late 1990s / early 2000s, while holding a position within the World Bank Group, I was responsible for assessments of the prospects and risks of the countries of East Asia where the World Bank was active.  This was not long after the East Asia crisis of 1997, and the countries were just beginning to recover.  Japan was important, both as a trading partner to the others and because Japan itself had gone through a somewhat similar crisis following 1990, when the Japanese financial bubble burst.

As part of this, I followed closely the quarterly GDP growth figures for Japan.  But as many analysts at the time noted, the quarter to quarter figures behaved in ways that were difficult to understand.  Components went up when one would have thought they would go down (and vice versa), the quarterly changes were far more extreme than seen elsewhere, and in general the quarter to quarter fluctuations were difficult to make sense of.  The volatility in the figures was far greater than one would have expected for an economy such as Japan’s.

This view among analysts was such a common one that the government agency responsible for the estimates felt it necessary to issue a news release in June 2000 defending its work and addressing a number of the concerns that had been raised.

I have no doubt that the Japanese government officials responsible for the estimates were well-qualified and serious professionals.  But it is not easy to estimate GDP and its components, the underlying data on which the statisticians relied might have had problems (including sample sizes that were possibly too small), and there may have been segments of the economy (in the less formal sectors) which might not have been captured well.

I have not followed closely in recent years, and do not know if the issues continue.  But Japan’s case illustrates that even a sophisticated agency, with good professionals, can have difficulty in arriving at GDP estimates that behave as one would expect.

b)  China:  The case of China illustrates the mirror image problem of what was found in Japan.  While the Japanese GDP estimates bounced around far too sharply from one quarter to the next, the GDP estimates for China showed remarkable, and not believable, stability.

Chinese growth rates have normally been presented as growth of GDP in the current period over what it was in the same period one year ago.  Seasonal adjustment is then not needed, and indeed China only started to present seasonally adjusted figures in 2011.  However, these estimates are still not fully accepted by many analysts.  Comparing GDP in the current quarter to what it was in the same quarter a year before overcomes this, but at the cost that it does not present information on growth just in the quarter, as opposed to total growth over the preceding year.

And the growth rates reported over the same quarter in the preceding year have been shockingly smooth.  Indeed, in recent years (from the first quarter of 2015 through to the recently released figures for the second quarter of 2018), China’s reported growth of its GDP over the year-earlier period has not been more than 7.0% nor less than 6.7% in each and every quarter.  Specifically, the year on year GDP growth rates from the first quarter of 2015 through to the second quarter of 2018 were (in sequence):  7.0%, 7.0%, 6.9%, 6.8%, 6.7%, 6.7%, 6.7%, 6.8%, 6.9%, 6.9%, 6.8%, 6.8%, 6.8%, and 6.7% (one can find the figures in, for example, the OECD database).  Many find this less than credible.

There are other problems as well in the Chinese numbers.  For example, it has often been the case that the reported growth in provincial GDP of the 31 provincial level entities in China was higher in almost all of the 31 provinces, and sometimes even in all of the provinces, than GDP growth was in China as a whole.  This is of course mathematically impossible, but not surprising when political rewards accrue to those with fast reported growth.

With such weak credibility, analysts have resorted to coming up with proxies to serve as indicators of what quarter to quarter might have been.  These might include electricity consumption, or railway tonnage carried, or similar indicators of economic production.  Indeed, there is what has been labeled the “Li index”, named after Li Keqiang (who was vice premier when he formulated it, and later China’s premier).  Li said he did not pay much attention to the official GDP statistics, but rather focused on a combination of electricity production, rail cargo shipments, and loan disbursements.  Researchers at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco who reproduced this and fitted it through some regression analysis found that it worked quite well.

And the index I found most amusing is calculated using nighttime satellite images of China, with an estimation of how much more night-time illumination one finds over time.  This “luminosity” index tracks well what might be going on with China’s GDP.

c)  An unidentified, newly independent, former colony:  Finally, this is a story which I must admit I received third hand, but which sounds fully believable.  In the mid-1970s I was working for a period in Kuala Lumpur, for the Government of Malaysia.  As part of an economic modeling project I worked closely with the group in the national statistical office responsible for estimating GDP.  The group was led by a very capable, and talkative, official (of Tamil origin), who related a story he had heard from a UN consultant who had worked closely with his group in the early 1970s to develop their system of national accounts.

The story is of a newly independent country in the mid-1960s (whose name I was either not told or cannot remember), and its estimation of GDP.  An IMF mission had visited it soon after independence, and as is standard, the IMF made forecasts of what GDP growth might be over the next several years.  Such forecasts are necessary in order to come up with estimates for what the government accounts might be (as tax revenues will depend on GDP), for the trade accounts, for the respective deficits, and hence for what the financing needs might be.

Such forecasts are rarely very good, especially for a newly independent country where much is changing.  But something is needed.

As time passed, the IMF received regular reports from the country on what estimated GDP growth actually was.  What they found was that reported GDP growth was exactly what had been forecast.  And when asked, the national statisticians responded that who were they to question what the IMF officials had said would happen!

How Fast Can GDP Grow?: Not as Fast as Trump Says

A.  Introduction

A debate now underway between the Trump Administration and others is on the question of how fast the economy can and will grow.  Trump claimed during the presidential campaign that if elected, he would get the economy to grow at a sustained rate of 5% or even 6%.  Since then the claim has been scaled back, to a 4% rate over the next decade according to the White House website (at least claimed on that website as I am writing this).  And an even more modest rate of growth of 3% for GDP (to be reached in 2020, and sustained thereafter) was forecast in the budget OMB submitted to Congress in May of this year.

But many economists question whether even a 3% growth rate for a sustained period is realistic, as would I.  One needs to look at this systematically, and this post will describe one way economists would address this critically important question.  It is not simply a matter of pulling some number out of the air (where the various figures presented by Trump and his administration, varying between 6% growth and 3%, suggests that that may not be far removed from what they did).

One way to approach this is to recognize the simple identity:  GDP will equal GDP per worker employed times the number of workers employed.  Over time, growth in the number of workers who can be employed will be equal to the growth in the labor force, and we have a pretty good forecast for that will be from demographic projections.  The other element will then depend on growth in how much GDP is produced per worker employed.  This is the growth in productivity, and while more difficult to forecast, we have historical numbers which can provide a sense for what its growth might be, at best, going forward.  The chart at the top of this post shows what it has been since 1947, and will be discussed in detail below.  Forecasts that productivity will now start to grow at rates that are historically unprecedented need to be viewed with suspicion.  Miracles rarely happen.

I should also be clear that the question being examined is the maximum rate at which one can expect GDP to grow.  That is, we are looking at growth in what economists call capacity GDP.  Capacity GDP is what could be produced in the economy with all resources, in particular labor, being fully utilized.  This is the full employment level of GDP, and the economy has been at or close to full employment since around 2015.  Actual GDP can be less than capacity GDP when the economy is operating at less than full employment.  But it cannot be more.  Thus the question being examined is how fast the economy could grow, at most, for a sustained period going forward, not how fast it actually will grow.  With mismanagement, such as what was seen in the government oversight of the financial markets (or, more accurately, the lack of such oversight) prior to the financial and economic collapse that began in 2008 in the final year of the Bush administration, the economy could go into a recession and actual GDP will fall below capacity GDP.  But we will give Trump the benefit of the doubt and look at how fast capacity GDP could grow at, assuming the economy can and will remain at full employment.

We will start with a look at what is expected for growth in the labor force and hence in the number of workers who can be employed.  That is relatively straightforward, and the answer is not to expect much possible growth in GDP from this source.  We will then look at productivity growth:  what it has been in the past and whether it could grow at anything close to what is implicit in the Trump administration forecasts.  Predicting what that actual rate of productivity growth might be is beyond the scope of this blog post.  Rather, we will be looking at it whether it can grow as fast as is implied by the Trump forecasts.  The answer is no.

B.  Growth in the Labor Force 

Every two years, the Bureau of Labor Statistics provides a detailed ten-year forecast of what it estimates the US labor force will be.  The most recent such forecast was published in December 2015 and provided its forecast for 2024 (along with historical figures up to 2014).  The basic story is that while the labor force is continuing to grow in the US, it is growing at an ever decreasing rate as the population is aging, the baby boom generation is entering into retirement, and decades ago birth rates fell.  The total labor force grew at a 1.2% annual rate between 1994 and 2004, at a 0.6% rate between 2004 and 2014, and is forecast by the BLS to grow at a 0.5% rate between 2014 and 2024.

But it is now 2017.  With a decelerating rate of growth, a growth rate in the latter part of a period will be less than in the early part of a period.  Taking account of where the labor force is now, growth going forward to 2024 will only be 0.3% (with these figures calculated based on the full numbers before round-off).  This is not much.

A plot of the US civilian labor force going back to 1948 puts this in perspective:

The labor force will be higher in 2024 than it is now, but not by much.  The labor force grew at a relatively high rate from the 1950s to the 1970s (of a bit over 2% a year), but then started to level off.  As it did, it continued to grow but at an ever slower rate.  There was also a dip after the economic collapse of 2008/09, but then recovered to its previous path.  When unemployment is high, some workers drop out of the labor force for a period. But we are now back to what the path before would have predicted.  If the BLS forecasts are correct, growth in the labor force will continue, but at a rate of just 0.3% from where it is now to 2024, to the point shown in red on the chart.  And this is basically a continuation of the path followed over the last few decades.

One should in particular not expect the labor force to get back to the rapid growth rate (of over 2% a year) the US had from the 1950s to the 1970s.  This would require measures such as that immigration be allowed to increase dramatically (which does not appear to enjoy much support in the Trump administration), or that grandma and grandpa be forced back into the labor force in their 70s and 80s rather than enjoy their retirement years (where it is not at all clear how this would “make America great again”).

I have spoken so far on the figures for the labor force, since that is what the BLS and others can forecast based largely on demographics.  Civilian employment will then be some share of this, with the difference equal to the number of unemployed.  That curve is also shown, in blue, in the chart.  There will always be some unemployment, and in an economic downturn the rate will shoot up.  But even in conditions considered to be “full employment” there will be some number of workers unemployed for various reasons. While economists cannot say exactly what the “full employment rate of unemployment” will be (it will vary over time, and will also depend on various factors depending on the make-up of the labor force), it is now generally taken to be in the range of a 4 to 5% unemployment rate.

The current rate of unemployment is 4.4%.  It is doubtful it will be much lower than this in the future (at least not for any sustained period).  Hence if the economy is at full employment in 2024, with unemployment at a similar rate to what it is now, the rate of growth of total employment from now to 2024 will be the same as the rate of growth of the labor from now to then.  That is, if unemployment is a similar share of the total labor force in 2024 as it is now, the rates of growth of the labor force and of total employment will match.  And that rate of growth is 0.3% a year.

This rate of growth in what employment can be going forward (at 0.3%) is well below what it was before.  Total employment grew at an annual rate of 2.1% over the 20 years between 1947 and 1967, and a slightly higher 2.2% between 1967 and 1987.  With total employment able to grow only at 1.8 or 1.9% points per annum less than what was seen between 1947 and 1987, total GDP growth (for any given rate of productivity growth) will be 1.8 or 1.9% points less.  This is not a small difference.

C.  Growth in Productivity 

Growth in productivity (how much GDP is produced per worker employed) is then the other half of the equation.  What it will be going forward is hard to predict; economists have never been very good at this.  But one can get a sense of what is plausible based on the historical record.

The chart below is the same as the one at the top of this post, but with the growth rates over 20 year periods from 1947 (10 years from 2007) also shown:

These 20 year periods broadly coincide with the pattern often noted for the post-World War II period for the US:  Relatively high growth (2.0% per year) from the late 1940s to the late 1960s; a slowdown from then to the mid 1980s (to 0.9%); a return to more rapid growth in productivity in the 1990s / early 2000s, although not to as high as in the 1950s and 60s (1.5% for 1987 to 2007); and then, after the economic collapse of 2008/2009, only a very modest growth (0.8% for 2007 to 2017, but much less from 2010 onwards).

Note also that these break points all coincide, with one exception (1987), with years where the economy was operating at full employment.  In the one exception (1987, near the end of the Reagan administration) unemployment was still relatively high at 6.6%.  While one might expect productivity levels to reach a local peak when the economy is at or close to full employment, that is not always true (the relationship is complex), and is in any case controlled for here by the fact the break points coincide (with the one exception) with full employment years.

Another way to look at this is productivity growth as a rolling average, for example over continuous 10 year periods:

 

Productivity, averaged over 10 year periods, grew at around 2% a year from the late 1940s up to the late 1960s.  It then started to fall, bottoming out at roughly 0.5% in the 1970s, before reverting to a higher pace.  It reached 2% again in the 10 year period of 1995 to 2005, but only for a short period before starting to fall again.  And as noted before, it fell to 0.8% for the 2007 to 2017 period.

What productivity growth going forward could at most be will be discussed below, but first it is useful to summarize what we have seen so far, putting employment growth and productivity growth together:

Growth Rates

Employment

GDP per worker

GDP

1947-1967

2.1%

2.0%

4.1%

1967-1987

2.2%

0.9%

3.1%

1987-2007

1.6%

1.5%

3.1%

2007-2017

0.6%

0.8%

1.4%

Employment grew at over 2% a year between the late 1940s and 1987.  This was the period of the post-war recovery and baby boom generation coming of working age.  With GDP per worker growing at 2.0% a year between 1947 and 1967, total GDP grew at a 4.1% rate.  It still grew at a 3.1% rate between 1967 and 1987 despite productivity growth slowing to just 0.9%, as the labor force continued to grow rapidly over this period.  And total GDP continued to grow at a 3.1% rate between 1987 and 2007 despite slower employment (and labor force) growth, as a recovery in productivity growth (to a 1.5% pace) offset the slower availability of labor.

It might, at first glance, appear from this that a return to 3% GDP growth (or even 4%) is quite doable.  But it is not.  Employment growth fell to a pace of just 0.6% between 2007 and 2017 (and the unemployment rates were almost exactly the same in early 2007, at 4.5%, and now, at 4.4%, so this matched labor force growth).  Going forward, as discussed above, the labor force is forecast to grow at a 0.3% pace between now and 2024.  To get to a 3% GDP growth rate now at such a pace of labor growth, one would need productivity to grow at a 2.7% pace.  To get a 4% GDP growth, productivity would have to grow at a 3.7% pace.  But productivity growth in the US since 1947 has never been able to get much above a 2% pace for any sustained period.  To go well beyond this would be unprecedented.

D.  Why Does This Matter?  And What Can Be Achieved?

Some readers might wonder why all this matters.  On the surface, the difference between growth at a 2% rate or 3% rate may not seem like much.  But it is, as some simple arithmetic illustrates:

  Alternative Growth Scenarios

 Growth Rates:

GDP 

Population

GDP per capita

Cumulative

Over 30 years

1.0%

0.8%

0.2%

6%

2.0%

0.8%

1.2%

43%

3.0%

0.8%

2.2%

91%

4.0%

0.8%

3.2%

155%

This table works out the implications of varying rates of hypothetical GDP growth, between 1.0% and 4.0%.  Population growth in the US is forecast by the Census Bureau at 0.8% a year (for the period to the 2020s).  It is higher than the forecast pace of labor force growth (of 0.3% in the BLS figures) primarily because of the aging of the population, so a higher and higher share of the adult population is entering their retirement years.

The result is that GDP growth at 1.0% a year will be just 0.2% a year in per capita terms with a 0.8% population growth rate.  After 30 years (roughly one generation) this will cumulate to a total growth in per capita income of just 6%.  But GDP growth at 2% a year will, by the same calculation, cumulate to total per capita income growth of 43%, to 91% with GDP growth of 3%, and to 155% with GDP growth of 4%.  These differences are huge.  What might appear to be small differences in GDP growth rates add up over time to a lot.  It does matter.

[Note that this does not address the distribution issue.  Overall GDP per capita may grow, as it has over the last several decades, but all or almost all may go only to a few.  As a post on this blog from 2015 showed, only the top 10% of the income distribution saw any real income growth at all between 1980 and 2014 – real incomes per household fell for the bottom 90%.  And the top 1%, or richer, did very well.

But total GDP growth is still critically important, as it provides the resources which can be distributed to people to provide higher standards of living.  The problem in the US is that policies followed since 1980, when Ronald Reagan was first elected, have led to the overwhelming share of the growth the US has achieved to go to the already well off. Measures to address this critically important, but separate, issue have been discussed in several earlier posts on this blog, including here and here.]

Looking forward, what pace of productivity growth might be expected?  As discussed above, while the US was able to achieve productivity growth at a rate of about 2.0% in the 1950s and 1960s, since then it was able to achieve a rate as high as this over a ten year period only once (between 1995 and 2005), and only very briefly.  And over time, there is some evidence that reaching the rates of productivity growth enjoyed in the past is becoming increasingly difficult.

A reason for this is the changing structure of the economy.  Productivity growth has been, and continues to be, relatively high in manufacturing and especially in agriculture. Mechanization and new technologies (including biological technologies) can raise productivity in manufacturing and in agriculture.  It is more difficult to do this in services, which are often labor intensive and personal.  And with agriculture and manufacturing a higher share of the economy in the past than they are now (precisely because their higher rates of productivity growth allowed more to be produced with fewer workers), the overall pace of productivity growth in the economy will move, over time, towards the slower rate found in services.

The following table illustrates this.  The figures are taken from an earlier blog post, which looked at the changing shares of the economy resulting from differential rates of productivity growth.

Productivity Growth

Agriculture

Manufacturing

Services

Overall (calculated)

1947 to 2015:

3.3%

2.8%

0.9%

1.4%

At GDP Shares of:

   – 1947 shares

8.0%

27.7%

64.3%

1.7%

   – 1980 shares

2.2%

23.6%

74.2%

1.4%

   – 2015 shares

1.0%

13.9%

85.2%

1.2%

The top line (with the figures in bold) shows the overall rates of productivity growth between 1947 and 2015 in agriculture (3.3%), manufacturing (2.8%), services (0.9%), and overall (1.4%).  The overall is for GDP, and matches the average for growth in GDP per employed worker between 1947 and 2017 in the chart shown at the top of this post.

The remaining lines on the table show what the pace of overall productivity growth would then have been, hypothetically, at these same rates of productivity growth by sector but with the sector shares in GDP what they were in 1947, or in 1980, or in 2015.  In 1947, with the sector shares of agriculture and manufacturing higher than what they were later, and services correspondingly lower, the pace of productivity growth overall (i.e. for GDP) would have been 1.7%.  But at the sector shares of 2015, with services now accounting for 85% of the economy, the overall rate of productivity growth would have been just 1.2%, or 0.5% lower.

This is just an illustrative calculation, and shows the effects of solely the shifts in sector shares with the rates of productivity growth in the individual sectors left unchanged.  But those individual sector rates could also change over time, and did.  Briefly (see the earlier blog post for a discussion), the rate of productivity growth in services decelerated sharply after the mid-1960s; the pace in agriculture was remarkably steady; while the pace in manufacturing accelerated after the early 1980s (explaining, to a large extent, the sharp fall in the manufacturing share of the economy from 24% in 1980 to just 14% in 2015).  But with services dominating the economy (74% in 1980, rising to 85% in 2015), it was the pace of productivity growth in services, and its pattern over time, which dominated.

What can be expected going forward?  The issue is a huge one, and goes far beyond what is intended for this post.  But especially given the headwinds created by the structural transformation in the economy of the past 70 years towards a dominance by the services sector, it is unlikely that the economy will soon again reach a pace of 2% productivity growth a year for a sustained period of a decade or more.  Indeed, a 1.5% rate would be exceptionally good.

And with labor force growth of 0.3%, a 1.5% pace for productivity would imply a 1.8% rate for overall GDP.  This is well below the 3% rate that the Trump administration claims it will achieve, and of course even further below the 4% (and 5% and 6%) rates that Trump has claimed he would get.

E.  Conclusion

As a simple identity, GDP will equal GDP per worker employed (productivity) times the number of workers employed.  Growth in GDP will thus equal the sum of the growth rates of these two components.  With a higher share of our adult population aging into the normal retirement years, the labor force going forward (to 2024) is forecast to grow at just 0.3% a year.  That is not much.  Overall GDP growth will then be this 0.3% plus the growth in productivity.  That growth in the post World War II period has never much exceeded 2% a year for any 10-year period.  If we are able to get to such a 2% rate of productivity growth again, total GDP would then be able to grow at a 2.3% rate.  But this is below the 3% figure the Trump administration has assumed for its budget, and far below the 4% (or 5% or 6%) rates Trump has asserted he would achieve.  Trump’s forecasts (whether 3% or 4% or 5% or 6%) are unrealistic.

But a 2% rate for productivity growth is itself unlikely.  It was achieved in the 1950s and 1960s when agriculture and manufacturing were greater shares of the economy, and it has been in those sectors where productivity growth has been most rapid.  It is harder to raise productivity quickly in services, and services now dominate the economy.

Finally, it is important to note that we are speaking of growth rates in labor, productivity, and GDP over multi-year, sustained, periods.  That is what matters to what living standards can be achieved over time, and to issues like the long-term government budget projections.  There will be quarter to quarter volatility in the numbers for many reasons, including that all such figures are estimates, derived from surveys and other such sources of information.  It is also the case that an exceptionally high figure in one quarter will normally soon be followed by an exceptionally low figure in some following quarter, as the economy, as well as the statistical measure of it, balances out over time.

Thus, for example, the initial estimate (formally labeled the “advance estimate”) for GDP growth in the second quarter of 2017, released on July 28, was 2.6% (at an annual rate). Trump claimed this figure to be “an unbelievable number” showing that the economy is doing “incredibly well”, and claimed credit for what he considered to be a great performance.  But it is a figure for just one quarter, and will be revised in coming months as more data become available.  It also follows an estimate of GDP growth in the first quarter of 2017 of just 1.2%.  Thus growth over the first half of the year averaged 1.9%. Furthermore, productivity (GDP per worker) grew at just a 0.5% rate over the first half of 2017.  While a half year is too short a period for any such figure on productivity to be taken seriously, such a performance is clearly nothing special.

The 1.9% rate of growth of GDP in the first half of 2017 is also nothing special.  It is similar to the rate achieved over the last several years, and is in fact slightly below the 2.1% annual rate seen since 2010.  More aptly, in the 28 calendar quarters between the second quarter of 2010 and the first quarter of 2017, GDP grew at a faster pace than that 2.6% estimated rate a total of 13 times, or almost half. The quarter to quarter figures simply bounce around, and any figure for a single quarter is not terribly meaningful by itself.

It therefore might well be the case that a figure for GDP growth of 3%, or even 4% or higher, is seen for some quarter or even for several quarters.  But there is no reason to expect that the economy will see such rates on a sustained basis, as the Trump administration has predicted.